A QUOTE TO START THINGS OFF WITH

A QUOTE TO START THINGS OFF

An Inning of T-ball is the most exciting 3 hours of sports - David Letterman




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I tell my kids on a regular basis that people are more important than things. I tell them this, because I believe it is true. Like most true...

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Thursday, January 29, 2009

Random Postings: The Guy who Makes the Donuts

A few years ago we had a family website and I would write occasional articles on it. Consider it a pre-blog blog. I named those articles Memo: Random. Occasionally I am going to post them here under Random Postings. This one is back 7 years ago from 1/27/2002.

Recently, I have been waking up in the middle of the night, usually around 3 A.M. Most nights, I go right back to sleep, but sometiimes I don't even try. This morning was one of those occasions.

I woke up at 4:30 after 4 hours of sleep. My wife, Amy, was feeding Charlie our soon to be 3 month old boy. She put him into bed and went back to sleep; but I was wide awake. So I got up, went into the computer room and looked up some things on the internet.

At about 6, our daughter Emma walked in the room. In order to let the other half of our family stay sleeping, I quietly got her dressed and we went out to buy donuts. I didn't have any cash on me, so we went to a Dunkin Donuts that I "remembered" accepted credit cards.

Emma and I got out of the car. The store looked how I expected a donut shop to look at 6 o'clock on a Sunday morning: sparsely populated. There was one car in the drive-thru, one customer ahead of me, and one "regular" nursing his coffee in the corner booth.

When it was our turn, I made our order, making sure to get a good variety. I asked Emma to tell the man what kind she wanted and in language typical of a 2 year old, she said she wanted a white one while pointing to a powdered donut. (If 2 year olds couldn't point it would be a lot harder to understand them.)

When it came time to pay, I pulled out my checkcard and much to my surprise and dismay was told I "remembered" wrong about them accepting credit cards. They did not!

I rather sheepishly had to admit, I had no actual money on me. My plan was to run to an ATM, get cash, and pick up the donuts. The counter person told me to just take the donuts and pay him back another time. I was reluctant to accept his offer but he insisted.

Emma and I took the donuts, went back to the car, got cash at the ATM and came back. By this time, activity at the store had perked up a little. I got in line to pay the guy back. At the same time the "regular" got in line behind me. I thought he was just refilling his coffee but he had come to talk to me.

The man was probably my Dad's age (late 50's/ early 60's). He was the kind of person Emma would refer to as a Grandpa. To Emma, there are four types of males (Baby, Kid, Man and Grandpa). He told me that I did not have to pay for the donuts, that he was picking up the tab.

The most embarrasing part of this incident of not bringing cash was the implication that our family was destitute and needed to panhandle for donuts. Thinking this was his impression, I politely declined indicating "I have money." He responded, "No, I've got it. It's for being honest and coming back."

I was still tempted to refuse his offer, but I think I correctly labeled that temptation as stubborn pride thanked him and went back home.

Many thoughts have penetrated my cranium about what kernel of truth to pull from this man's act of kindness. The first thought I had was that honesty must be a small commodity these days when a total stranger thinks it an oddity that needs to be rewarded. Another along those same lines was that honesty should be a given and needs no reward. The third was always keep $10.00 in the glove box for donut related emegencies. Finally I latched onto this:

Honesty, like any virtue should be pursued, taught and praised when seen in action. As a member of our society, the "regular" was simply affirming the ideal of honesty by giving my family breakfast on the house.

As Emma and Charlie grow up, Amy and I will try to teach them many valuable lessons about character. I can think of none stronger than when you spot virtue in our fallen world: be the guy who buys the donuts.

Meanwhile in 2009: The Dunkin Donuts was torn down recently and a new Dunkin Donuts just opened up at the same location. They now accept credit cards at least I "remember" using one there. :)

Next Time: Beginnings Part II: A Walk to the Lake

2 comments:

  1. That's a wonderful story! We've had similar incidents of random acts of kindness, and I try to do the same whenever the opportunity presents itself.

    Peace and Laughter,
    Cristina

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  2. Dave, I love that story as well. God sends angels to help us out at times like that.
    I had a similar incident as well. Had to do with tires and the fact that I didn't have cash or a credit card that day myself. God puts those people in our lives to remind us just how humble we need to be. I do hope that you eventually paid the man back by doing something for someone else!!! It is a great thing to do for God.
    Diane C.

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