Thursday, October 11, 2012

Carnival of Homeschooling Comics Edition

Welcome to the October 9, 2012 edition of Carnival of Homeschooling.

First of all, sorry I'm late.  It is early Thursday morning here in Illinois as I put the finishing touches on this carnival.  It is so early Thursday morning that it is late Wednesday night in California.  I hoped to have this ready on time, but I ran into so many deadlines this week that someting had to give.  With that said, let's get Carnivalizing!

I think it is pretty comical  that I am hosting the Carnival of Homeschooling this week even though I have been not posting consistently about home schooling or anything for the past few months. I signed up for this week's spot months ago long before I started working full time and taking a class along with  regular regimen of home educating.


I am so busy it is easy for me to imagine looking like this . . .

Charlie Brown's Christmas Stocking by Charles M. Schulz - detail by fantagraphics


























Charlie Brown's Christmas Stocking by Charles M. Schulz - detail, a photo by fantagraphics on Flickr.

Chuck Brown and I cordially welcome you to the Comics edition of the Carnival of Home Schooling.

There are basically 3 things that come to mind when hearing  the word comics: comic strips, comic books and stand up comics. Interspersed between this week's Carnival entries I will give my thoughts on all 3 types of comics.

Lets start things off with Henry Cate who runs this little smorgasbord of home school blogging.  He  has reviewed a book that he thinks all parents should read.Check out Book Review: Why Gender Matters at Why Homeschool

Comics I - The Comic Strip.

I love reading the comics in the newspaper.  I am a big fan of many Comic Strips.  I would say my all time favorite 5 are Peanuts, Calvin & Hobbes, For Better or For Worse, Mister Boffo and The Far Side. 


Here is one of my favorite Peanut's cartoons:


Peanuts sample



Cartoonists are a kind of artist and with that in mind Ann presents Artist Study - Georgia O'Keefe posted at Harvest Moon by Hand.

Rebecca presents My Rock in the River posted at Into the wind of freedom. A home educating adventure..

Barbara West presents Tiny Tots-Caring For Our Children posted at Tiny Tots-Caring For Our Children.

One of my favorite Comic Strips is Home Spun Juggling by Cristina Ramos Payne a home school Mom and frequent contributor to this carnival.  I did not take the time to solicit posts this week and I am sure that if I had, Cristina would have contributed one.  So I am breaking Carnival protocol and including one of her recent strips here as it fits my theme.  If you don't like it, you can lump it.  (You can take the guy out of Junior High, but you can't take Junior High out of the guy.)

 



Angela Gray of Graymattersonline presents When Arithmetic is Reading

Katherine of No Fighting No Biting presents Slow but Steady wins the reading race. She's ecstatic that her 8 year old is reading for fun.


Comics II - Comic Books.
 
Avengers #1
 
I actually use Comic Books in my home schooling. Spider Droid and I have read Graphic Novel versions of 2000 leagues under the sea and several civil war battles including the Battle of Gettysburg. While you probably you know that you don't have to use comic books for home schooling, Linda Dobson of Parent at the Helm asks the provocative question: Homeschooling, do I need to use textbooks?


Natalie of Fill Your Book Shelf reviews The Great Motion Mission by Cora Lee. She says it is a Magic School Bus type book about physics.

Action Comics #1
First appearance of Superman

















In Comic Books it is very possible to see a story pitting heroes and villains and sometimes heroes and other heroes against each other. For example Superman vs. Batman or Spiderman vs. Doctor Octopus. Our next post comes from the blog Home School vs. Public School.
Christie presents Science for your Home School or Public School Child.

Katherine of No Fighting No Biting presents  Slow but Steady wins the reading race.  She's ecstatic that her 8 year old is reading for fun. 
 
Comics III - Stand Up Comics
 
I always wanted to be a stand up comic.  I am what you'd call a sit down comic.  When I get up to tell a joke, I am usually told to sit down. 
 

 
 
 
Steve Martin once said that he believed Ronald Reagan could turn this country (The U.S) into what it once was. He then paused for effect and said : A barren wasteland covered with ice.  I happen to be a big fan of Reagan,  but still love the joke because it is a classic example of the kind of word play and misdirection stand up comics engage in. Martin and other comedians have taken their comic sensibilities to the internet these days  via twitter feeds and other social media. About the time of the Republican National convention, Conan O'Brien tweeted that he saw conservative Latino children playing Marco Rubio at his local pool.


Phyllis Sather  of Phyllis Sather.com presents Why are you Ringing the Bell?

Another one of my favorite comedians Steven Wright once said that he worked at a fire hydrant factory.  He then paused and said you couldn't park anywhere near the place.  Stand up comics and comic book heroes are similar in that many do their work at night.  Mrs.White of The Legacy of Home shares about Home Studies in the Evening Hours. 

Sarah of Small World at Home shares a review of two fantastic new attractions in Pigeon Forge, TN, that are great adventures for homeschoolers in Field Trip Review: The Tomb and Magiquest in Pigeon Forge.

Andrea Hermitt presents If You don't home school your kid's you don't love them at Notes From A Homeschooled Mom

That concludes this All Things Comics edition of the Carnival.

Thank you for participating, visiting, breathing or whatever. 

Submit your blog article to the next edition of carnival of homeschooling
using our carnival submission form.

Past posts and future hosts can be found on our

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3 comments:

  1. I love comics as well. I was raised in Belgium and there are a lot of comics writers in that country : the Adventures of Tintin, The Smurfs, Lucky Luke, etc... just to name a few.
    I was even lucky enough to meet "the father" of The Smurfs. He lived in the same village South of Brussels ...until he became rich and moved to Switzerland where he could pay less taxes!
    Anyway...I find that you can learn so much through comic strips!

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  2. Great job, Dave! I can't believe I missed submitting to this carnival. My only excuse is that I was preparing to take the family to New York Comic Con. :o)

    Peace and Laughter,
    Cristina

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  3. I love using comic books for school... They're art and English all rolled into one, and crazy-fun on top of it.

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